Month: November 2018

January and February Training

January and February Training

Concealed Carry Handgun Training in January and February

January and February are typically the coldest months of the year, here, in eastern North Carolina (I know–folks used to more severe winters, below freezing temperatures for weeks, and feet of snow scoff at our whining about 30 degree weather, and think our shutting down after a 1-inch snowfall incredulous). We conduct our CCHGT shooting proficiency outdoors, and we know that cold, and rainy days negatively impact proficiency. However, on any given day the temperature may well rise into the 40s or 50s, giving us a reprieve from the cold.  That said, it would be a shame to let those mild days pass without training.

So, during January and February we will keep an eye on the weekly weather forecasts. If the forecasts suggest an upcoming warm(ish) Saturday, then LNPDSA will schedule a Saturday Concealed Carry Handgun Training practicum. Watch the website. When a mild Saturday is forecast, we will publish a post with the particulars for the anticipated training day (certain subscribers get notified by email, as well).

Subscribe through our “Stay in Touch” page to you receive email when the weather forecasts predict weather mild enough to  convene a Saturday Concealed Carry Handgun Training practicum.

The Tuesday/Thursday CCHGT classes will continue every other week since the shooting proficiency is scheduled separately. We will simply have to be diligent about watching for mild days to complete the shooting practicum, and arranging times appropriately.

Practice with Purpose

Practice with Purpose

Infuse Your Practice with Purpose

Shooters often go to a range because we haven’t shot in a while, and simply want to “snap some caps.” I’ve done it. However, while shooting recreationally with no clear objective may satisfy our immediate penchant to shoot, why not combine that with focused practice. Why not infuse your practice with purpose?

Defensive shooting is a complex combination of skills that must be practiced to retain even a modicum of proficiency. Practice, correct practice, helps develop the neural pathways, aka “muscle memory,” necessary when traumatic events stun our higher level thinking into inaction.

Dry Fire Practice: Slow is Smooth, Smooth is Fast

An effective practice technique is to break your larger movements into smaller discrete events. One of the discrete events when drawing from a holster is ensuring you grip the handgun firmly prior to drawing it from your holster. Depending on the position of the holster, that may involve making sure your thumb presses into your body to get a firm handhold on the pistol’s grip. Another example may be one where you may have a thumb-break holster, that discrete movement may be to position your hand so that the thumb-break is opened at the same time the web of your hand hits the back of the pistol’s grip.

In the beginning you may have many small events, perhaps as many as eight. Keep it basic. Don’t add cover garments in the beginning. Concentrate on a proper grip, drawing the handgun straight up from the holster, rotating the muzzle from vertical to horizontal, adding your support hand, and moving the handgun to a shooting position, all while ensuring you do not sweep yourself or someone who could be standing next to you with the muzzle. It helps to number each step, and count them off, cadence-like, as you practice them. It’s fine if your beginning practice is somewhat disjointed, like a robot whose timing is off. Slow is OK. You’re building new neural pathways-it’s identical repetitions that count, not speed. Don’t rush. With continued practice, some steps will merge, your movements will become smoother, and the numbers in your cadence will decrease.

When dry firing, do NOT practice in the same room where you keep your ammunition, and triple check your firearm to ensure it’s empty before starting your practice session. You may also consider using dummy rounds, barrel blocks, or laser emitting simulators in your practices.

Range Practice: Keep Records

It’s important to infuse your practice with purpose while on the range, as well. Have a clear goal in mind. For example, part of your range practice may be to concentrate on holding proper sight alignment and sight picture through the moment of firing. It’s helpful in this sequence to shoot at a target with no images or bulls eyes, just blank paper. Remember to follow-through, that is after the recoil, bring the sights back on target, and keep them there for a moment. Later, in defensive pistol exercises, the follow-through becomes part of your scanning for other threats.

Another approach may be to practice specific drills, such as double taps (shooting twice in quick succession). Start slowly, striving for accuracy. Once you are consistently hitting the same spot, only then increase your speed by decreasing the interval between shots.

When practicing with purpose, keep records of your practice sessions. Recording your practice sessions gives you two advantages: The first is that your records hold you accountable for improvement. The second is that your practice sessions are recorded so that improvements are measurable. Don’t worry if some sessions don’t go as well as you had hoped. Some days of shooting are better than others–what you are looking for is improvement trends. Are you improving over the relative long term?

Two items that you may want to acquire for practicing with a purpose are a shot timer and drill cards. Both are available from a variety of sources. Avoid using your cell phone with a shot timer app by itself. Cell phones don’t have the audio discrimination required to accurately track your activity. However, there are attachments available that plug into the headset jack of most phone that do improve the phone’s ability to track shots.

Wrapping Up

Practicing with purpose hones your defensive pistol skills by giving you measurable steps and goals, and by building on the neural pathways (“muscle memory”) that may be needed in a defensive situation.